DIYROCKETS Challenges YOU to Collaboratively Design an Open Source 3D Printed Rocket Engine that Could Carry Nano-Satellites into Space

WINNERS ANNOUNCED

THE CHALLENGE

Over the last few years multiple companies, institutions and individuals have started building nano-satellites and other small satellites. These little satellites are packed with electronics and range from the size of a computer chip to a smart phone to a pumpkin. With their communication and research capabilities, they have multiple applications working individually or in coordination with one another. But, with the high cost of earth to space transport, how in the world are they going to get up into space?

We challenge YOU to design a 3D printed rocket engine that could become part of a propulsion system and vehicle to carry nano-satellites into space.

3D Printed Rocket Engine by RocketMoonlighting

OVERVIEW

​The purpose of the competition is to promote innovation and cost effectiveness in small payload delivery through the development of open source collaboratively designed 3D printed rocket engines.  This competition focuses on promoting innovation and lowering costs through the collaborative design process, understanding the business cases, and exploring the possibilities of 3D printing for the space industry. 

This is  the first step in what we hope will be a series of competitions to design technology parts and systems (propulsion systems, launch vehicles) to achieve our goal of sending payloads to space. Our long-term our vision is to launch hundreds of competitions for different space technologies, products, and parts, building everything from satellites to robots to space medical sensors.

THE PRIZES 


$5000 - 1st Prize from for best rocket engine 



$2500 - Student Prize for best rocket engine built by a student team and 50% reduction in membership fees to the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) for all team members



$2500 - Collaborative Design Prize for best contribution to collaborative design

Each winning team will also receive $165 in credit for 3D printing at Shapeways​ and consulting from the Silicon Valley Space Center.

 

All teams will be featured with their work in the DIYROCKETS Design Gallery.

THE OBJECTIVE

​The objective of this competition is to generate collaborative designs and business cases for safe, affordable 3D printed rocket engines that can carry between .5kg - 10 kg into Low Earth Orbit. 

SUMMARY OF RULES AND GUIDELINES

Your design must be open source.

​Please see the design and technical requirements of 3D printing by visiting the Shapeways Material Overview and Design Guide for 3D printing stainless steel.

Your design must be safe and legal according to your local jurisdiction.

See our competition Rules and Team Agreement for full details.

 

SUMMARY OF RULES AND GUIDELINES

Your design must be open source.

​Please see the design and technical requirements of 3D printing by visiting the Shapeways Material Overview and Design Guide for 3D printing stainless steel.

Your design must be safe and legal according to your local jurisdiction.

See our competition Rules and Team Agreement for full details.

 

THE JUDGES 

Our jury represents leading visionaries and experts from the technical and design world.

Dean Kamen, founder, FIRST and president, DEKA Research & Development Corporation

 

SUMMARY OF JUDGING CRITERIA

Please see the Rules for detailed descriptions of Judging Criteria.

1st Prize for Best Overall Rocket Engine Criteria: 

TECHNICAL CRITERIA: Is your design likely to meet the basic technical requirements necessary for delivering a small payload into low earth orbit?  Will your rocket achieve the necessary thrust, burn time and not melt?  Is your design efficient and using minimal propellant?  Is your design safe?

COLLABORATIVE DESIGN CRITERIA: Did you engage in collaborative design efforts  during the competition? Did you publicly post your design as early as possible, sharing and receiving meaningful feedback with other entrants and the public and incorporating that feedback into your decision process if you think it could improve the design?

BUSINESS CASEIs your design cost-efficient for the emerging small payload industry? Is it more competitive than current products that exist? Does your design offer any new innovations or features?

Student Prize for Best Overall Rocket Engine Criteria:

Judging criteria for this prizes is the same as 1st Prize for Best Overall Rocket Engine Criteria but is awarded for a design submitted by a team of students from an educational institution. 

Collaborative Design Prize Criteria:

Did you engage in collaborative design efforts during the competition? Did you publicly post your design as early as possible, sharing and receiving meaningful feedback with other entrants and the public and incorporating that feedback into your decision process if you thought it could improve the design?

Dean Kamen is a leading American scientist and inventor whose products include the Segway human transporter and the iBOT battery-powered wheelchair. As an inventor, he holds more than 440 U.S. and foreign patents, many of them for innovative medical devices that have expanded the frontiers of health care worldwide.



Angelo Vermeulen, artist, space scientist

 



​​Angelo Vermeulen is an artist, biologist, space scientist and community organizer. In his work he ties together technological, ecological, and social systems through group engagement and collaboration. 'Biomodd' is one of his most well-known art projects and consists of a worldwide series of interactive art installations in which computers and ecology coexist. In 2009 he launched 'Space Ecologies Art and Design (SEAD)', a platform for artistic research on the architectures and politics of space colonization. He is a member of the European Space Agency’s Arts & Science Topical Team, and is currently Crew Commander of the NASA-funded HI-SEAS Mars simulation in Hawai'i. His space-related work led him to start a new PhD at Delft University of Technology developing paradigm-shifting concepts for evolvable starships.



EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS

Visit the DIYROCKETS Open Space University to learn more about rockets, 3D Printing, Nano-Satellites and more. ​

​Taylor Wilson, Inventor​



Taylor Wilson is an American nuclear scientist who was noted in 2008 for being the youngest person in the world (at age 14) to build a working fusor.

 

OPENING THE SPACE FRONTIER

Do you have an idea for a different space technology design? ​ Go ahead and submit other 3D printed rocket part designs or designs for other space technologies to the platform. Although these designs cannot win this competition, your work will become part of the community and will be showcased to the world, generating feedback and exposing your idea to potential new collaborators, investors and the media.​​

​Christopher Hartney, Space Technology Analyst​



Chris Hartney is a space technology analyst working on the latest innovations in space technology related to 3D printing, the Makers Movement and other initiatives focused on opening the space frontier to all such as the PhoneSat project.  He has worked with NASA through Jacobs Technology.  Chris graduated with a Mater's Degree in Aerospace Engineering with a concentration on Aircraft Design at San Jose State Univeristy.  Before moving to the Bay Area, he graduated from the Univeristy of California Santa Barbara with a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering.

COMPETITION SCHEDULE

 

Registration open until April 6, 2013, 11:59 PM PST

​First 3D Draft of Design due April13, 2013, 11:59 PM PST.

Concept Note due April 13, 2013, 11:59 PM PST
Business Case due June 1, 2013, 11:59 PM PST

Final Design due June 1, 2013, 11:59 PM PST (NOW JUNE 30, 2013)

Winners announced by July 1, 2013 (NOW AUGUST 1, 2013)

Please see our Rules for a detailed description of the above deliverables. Please see the registration requirements in our Team Agreement.

REGISTER
Interested in hosting a future challenge?  CONTACT US